Archive for Dungeons

Megadungeon Level One

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 21, 2014 by Kullervo

Unkeyed:

Level 1 Unkeyed

And keyed:

Level 1 Keyed

This is the replacement dungeon level I drew after being dissatisfied with my first attempt. you’ll notice that is it bigger, but that the entrance (D1) and the exits (D8 and D19) are in the same relative places. This is because I’ve already planned out where the different connections between levels are relative to each other; one of the big ideas in this dungeon is that each level connects to many other levels (no level connects to fewer than two other levels, and some connect to as many as six).

In this level, the exits to levels two and three are easy to find–this is another characteristic of the dungeon: it will never be hard to find the pathway to go through the levels sequentially. The dungeon was originally meant to be used, after all. On the other hand, many of the out-of-order level connections or connections to sublevels may be hidden.

Quick rundown of the different areas:

The D areas are just generic dungeon. Not much treasure ebcause they’ve basically been picked clean, but also not much in the way of really challenging monsters. Maybe a scavenger or a wandering monster or two. The big exception is D20-D26, which was once the lair of a tribe of kobolds, before they were driven out by the goblins in the G areas. Not much is left in terms of loot, but the whole area is still booby trapped like crazy. D16 is a large cistern/reservoir, with underwater tunnels leading to the S areas. Watch out for the water rats.

The B areas were originally barracks (you can see the fighting pit in B7). There’s a mess hall (B11), a drill floor (B2), offices and quarters for officers (B3-B6), an armory (B8), a smithy (B9), and a kitchen at B10 with a secret passage into the larders. These areas are mostly inhabited at present by a gang of brigands, with their loot.

The L areas are the larders, which are now completely infested with dog-sized bloodthirsty carnivorous chickens. They are mean, and extremely territorial, and that’s just the hens. The rooster is the size of a horse and pure evil. The whole area is basically buried in chicken shit, and the level’s other inhabitants avoid it. That said, the larders were not only stocked with foodstuffs–the whole area is riddled with secret rooms where there are still valuables left for the taking.

The S areas are full of grates to water tunnels below and weird machinery. They are difficult to get to, and used as the lair of a bunch of really big giant water rats. There’s also some decent treasure in there though, so it’s worth trying to find.

The K areas were once kennels. The hounds are all dead, and the area is haunted by a gray ooze, that can slip through the locked and rusty bars.

The G areas have long been used as the lair of a goblin tribe, led by a self-styled king, with a decent haul of treasure. It’s not clear what the rooms were originally used for.

The X areas are mostly abandoned, because an extremely dangerous predator lairs at X4. The only other inhabitants are a mixed group of human and goblin outcasts, hiding out at X8 and planning revenge.

Free Hand-Drawn Dungeon Map for You

Posted in Dungeons & Dragons with tags , , , , , , , on May 13, 2014 by Kullervo

I drew this a few days ago and decided I wasn’t actually going to use it after all, so feel free. I had 10′ squares in mind. The map was intended to be the first level of a twelve-level dungeon. The entrance is through a shaft in the roof of the lozenge/diamond-shaped room in the bottom right corner. Exits to levels 2 and 3 are by stairways in the bottom right and top left. There should be no choke points, and a lot of different ways to loop through the dungeon.

Spare Map

This is pretty representative of my current mapping style. The downside is, not that many cool features or really unusual rooms, which I used to do better at.

D&D Classics Is Live! Hot Damn!

Posted in Dungeons & Dragons, Swords & Sorcery with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 22, 2013 by Kullervo

Hot damn! Wizards of the Coast has pdfs for sale again! I can’t tell if the price point is the same as when it was all taken down in 2009 (I seem to recall a lot more $4.99 products and a lot fewer $9.99 products), but it all still looks very resonable, and in any case cheaper than what you have to pay on the secondary market.

Honestly, I had stopped buying anything from Wizards of the Coast awhile ago and I had basically written them off (played 4e and liked it but didn’t love it; have no interest at all in 5e/Next; am now only really interested in older editions), but it looks like they’re back in the game. This was pretty much the only way they were going to get me to give them my money again, and they’ve done it.

If you’ll excuse me, I’m going to go demonstrate with my wallet that this was a sound business decision (on the other hand, I promise you right now that my productivity for the day is just shot to hell). To start with, I think I shall purchase…

C1: The Hidden Shrine of Tamoachan
HR7: The Crusades Campaign Sourcebook
Manual of the Planes (AD&D 1e)

But I have a bunch of other stuff in my wish list that I’ll be getting in short order–lots of classic modules and 1e hardback/sourcebooks. Oh, and I fully intend to buy every single Planescape pdf they release.

New D&D Monster: Foul Hound

Posted in Dungeons & Dragons with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 28, 2011 by Kullervo

Foul Hound

No. Enc.: 1d6
Alignment: Chaotic
Movement: 180’ (60’)
Armor Class: 7
Hit Dice: 3+1
Attacks: 2 (tentacle lash)
Damage: 1d6 plus disease (see below)
Save: F2
Morale: 9
Hoard Class: None
XP: 135

Foul Hounds are large wolves with eyes of baleful green flame and clusters of long, ropy black tentacles emerging from their mouths. They serve evil druids and priests of nature as a boon from the dark gods, and are rarely found in the wild.

The tentacles of a Foul Hound drip with disease, and an adventurer hit by one must save versus poison or be smitten with a horrible fever and die within 2d10 days. The victim may be cured by a cure disease spell, but while sick, takes a -2 penalty to hit rolls and heals from all damage at half the normal rate.

Foul Hounds are also known for their eerie, terrifying howls. An adventurer who hears a Foul Hound’s howl for the first time must save against paralysis or be frozen with madness and fear for 1d6 rounds.

Illustration by David Deitrick

New D&D Monster: Albino Alligator

Posted in Dungeons & Dragons with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 27, 2011 by Kullervo

No. Enc.: 1d6 (2d8)
Alignment: Chaotic
Movement: 90’ (30’)
Swim: 90’ (30’)
Armor Class: 5
Hit Dice: 2
Attacks: 1 (bite)
Damage: 1d8
Save: F1
Morale: 7
Hoard Class: None
XP: 29

These blind, subterranean alligators navigate by echolocation, but their subsonic screams cause extreme distraction, irritability and confusion. This effect is magnified when multiple Albino Alligators are present. Every round that a creature is within 10’ of an Albino Alligator, it must save against spells or be affected for that round as if under the influence of a confuse spell. For every Albino Alligator beyond the first one that is within 10’ of a creature, that creature must make its saving throw at a -1 modifier.

Illustration by David Deitrick

New D&D Monster: Blight Hulk

Posted in Dungeons & Dragons with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 24, 2011 by Kullervo

Blight Hulk

No. Enc.: 1 (1d3)
Alignment: Chaotic
Movement: 90’ (30’)
Armor Class: 4
Hit Dice: 4+2
Attacks: 2 (slam)
Damage: 1d8/1d8
Save: F4
Morale: 10
Hoard Class: XI
XP: 205

AA looming, 10’ mass of corpses stitched together by black, pustulent vines and roots, a Blight Hulk is a true monstrosity. Apart from its size, a Blight Hulk is immediately distinguishable by its gaping, slack maw lined with teeth of thorns and jagged bone. A Blight Hulk is utterly mindless except for an all-consuming urge to consume and destroy.

Blight Hulks are completely blind and deaf, and can only sense the presence of other creatures within 10’ by the vibrations they create. However, if attached with a missile weapon, a Blight Hulk will charge in the direction of the attack until it finds a target or is attacked from a different direction.

If a Blight Hulk hits a creature smaller than it with both slam attacks, it will shove the target down its gullet, where the target will be jabbed with rows of poisoned spines (automatic 1d6 damage per turn until the target or the Blight Hulk is dead, plus the target must save versus poison or die in 1d4 turns).

Like ordinary Blightlings, Blight Hulks are undead (and thus immune to charm, hold person and sleep) but are generally immune to turning by a cleric, except by clerics that specifically serve deities of nature or nature itself.

Illustration by David Deitrick

New D&D Monster: Giant Mutant Slime Eel

Posted in Dungeons & Dragons with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 24, 2011 by Kullervo

Giant Mutant Slime Eel

No. Enc.: 1
Alignment: Chaotic
Movement (Swim:) 120’ (40’)
Armor Class: 4
Hit Dice: 6+1
Attacks: 2 (bite, acid slime)
Damage: 2d8/2d6
Save: F4
Morale: 8
Hoard Class: VII
XP: 680

When exposed to vile magic for a long period of time, a single Slime Eel may begin to devour its own kind, grow to an enormous size and even develop an evil cunning intelligence. Such Mutant Slime Eels can grow up to 20’ in length and 5’ in diameter, their rasplike mouths grow razor-sharp, flexible chitinous plates develop in segments along their bodies, and their feeding feelers grow longer and gain prehensile dexterity. Only their simple, primitive eye and their sickly pinkish color remain the same.

An active Mutant Slime Eel generates slime that fills the water for 10’ except that the mutant slime eel’s slime is fully acidic, doing 1d6 damage per round to every creature exposed to the slime. The Mutant Slime Eel’s slime also erodes weapons and armor: each turn roll 1d6 for every non-magical weapon or piece of armor exposed to the slime. On a roll of 1, the item is dissolved.

A Mutant Slime Eel can spit its slime as a missile weapon (40’ range), doing 2d6 damage and potentially dissolving weapons and armor as above.

Illustration by David Deitrick

New D&D Monster: Slime Eel

Posted in Dungeons & Dragons with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 23, 2011 by Kullervo


Slime Eel

No. Enc.: 1d3 (1d6)
Alignment: Neutral
Movement (Swim): 120’ (40’)
Armor Class: 8
Hit Dice: 2
Attacks: 1 (bite)
Damage: 1d6
Save: F1
Morale: 7
Hoard Class: None
XP: 38

Slime eels are disgusting aquatic creatures, 8’ in length and lacking bones or a separate jaw. Their heads are merely a blunt end to their fat, pinkish, wormlike bodies with a single primitive eye and a disc-shaped rasping mouth surrounded by blubbery feelers. Their boneless bodies can squeeze through surprisingly tight spaces.

Sluggish except when feeding, slime eels burrow into the mud and rocks of subterranean river bottoms when no prey is available and go into torpor for months until they sense suitable food, at which time they can quickly enter a feeding frenzy. Adventurers caught in a mass of feeding slime eels run the risk of being knocked prone (roll 1d6 each round; characters are knocked prone on a roll of 1).

When active, a slime eel exudes a slick, viscous ooze that clouds the water within 10’ of the slime eel, imposing a -2 to-hit penalty against any attacker who relies on sight to hit. The slime also works as an anticoagulant; consequently, any wound inflicted by a slime eel will continue to do 1 point of damage every round that the wounded creature remains in the slime. Canny adventurers may try to coat their weapons with a defeated slime eel’s slime. Slime harvested from a dead slime eel retains its potency for up to an hour; each dose of the slime is good for one use when applied to a weapon and will cause a wound inflicted by that weapon to bleed for an extra point of damage on the next round. 1d3 doses may be harvested from each defeated eel.

Illustration by David Deitrick

New D&D Monster: Blightling

Posted in Dungeons & Dragons with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 2, 2011 by Kullervo


Blightling

No. Enc.: 1d6 (2d6 plus 1 Blightling Priest)
Alignment: Chaotic
Movement: 90’ (30’)
Armor Class: 5
Hit Dice: 2+1
Attacks: 1 (thorn slash)
Damage: 1d6 plus paralysis (see below)
Save: F2
Morale: 10
Hoard Class: XXI
XP: 53

Blightlings are a disturbing combination of plant and undead. Standing the size of a human, they resemble pale, desiccated corpses wrapped in shrouds of ragged black, brown and green cloth, with knotted, twisting muscles beneath their thin-stretched skin. In truth, instead of flesh, Blightlings are animated by a coiled, gnarled mass of rootlike growths between skin and skeleton. Their eyes are black, empty sockets, and they are incapable of speech or sound.

Venomous thorns project from a Blightling’s fingertips, and a character hit with a Blightling’s thorns must save versus paralysis or be paralyzed for 2d4 turns. This paralysis may be cured with cure light wounds. Paralyzed humanoids are then dragged away by Blightlings to be sacrificed to their loathsome, dark forest gods. Sacrificed humanoids are buried among the roots of evil trees and have a 35% chance of rising three days later as a Blightling.

Although undead for most purposes (and thus immune to charm, hold person and sleep), Blightlings are generally immune to turning by a cleric, except by clerics that specifically serve deities of nature or nature itself, as a Blightling is as much the spawn of a distorted, corrupted plant as it is an undead creature.

Illustration by David Deitrick

Jeff Rients: The Dungeon As The Psyche

Posted in Dungeons & Dragons with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 20, 2011 by Kullervo

In response to a recent open thread on Grognardia, Jeff Rients posted the following comment:

I believe that the descent into the dungeon is a symbolic representation of the rational mind attempting to understand the irrational, unconscious self. Therefore dungeons should have something important to say but they are under no obligation to make any sense.

I don’t know how seriously he meant this, but I think it might be one of the most, if not the most, important things ever said about roleplaying games. I will be thinking about this pretty intensely, so expect a more substantial post about it soon.