The Annals of Stonehell Dungeon – Season 1 – Seventh Session

The Annals of Stonehell are the weekly record of the semi-seasonal game of D&D that I run using the brilliant Michael Curtis’s Stonehell dungeon.  (Go and buy it now; it’s worth every dang penny.)  All installments are indexed here.

August 4, 2016

The party continued to explore the Contested Corridors, looking for the fabled neutral ground settlement of Kobold Corners while dealing with the threat of the Open Sore Orc Tribe.  The party covered a huge amount of ground, and here’s what they found:

Following the mysterious figure!  Into a trap!  The party went ahead and opened the portcullis and followed the mysterious figure from last session through an octagonal room and down a corridor, sending Rotam the Rotten (played by Chris) into a pit trap.  The mysterious figure was not seen again.

Another octagonal room!  And the sound of orcs!  Further down the passageway, the player characters found a nearly identical octagonal room but decorated differently and with a ruined statue in it.  To the south, they heard the raucous sound of orcs, so they decided to explore through a portcullis to the west, as the party’s numbers were small this week and their luck tangling with orcs had been mixed at best.

Child labor!  And an angry crystal statue!  The party made Hulk, the huge but almost certainly underage henchman, hold the loud portcullis open while Dhilgo Three-Quarters (played by Ann) checked out the next room, which was barred from the outside.  The room had a further door and a massive crystal statue.  Rotam tried the door, and the statue came to life, swinging its fists.  Rotam ducked and the party skedaddled out of the room, barring it again and finally letting Hulk lower the portcullis.

A desecrated church!  And cannibals!  The party kicked in the door of what turned out to be some sort of old chapel, now being used as a larder (!) by a cadre of horrible, insane cannibals—some of the descendants of Stonehell’s original inmates.  The player characters applied flaming oil and missile weapons liberally, and were able to take out the cannibals.  Nobody was particularly keen on thoroughly exploring the gag-inducing room, so the party moved on, satisfied that they had done the world a favor.

A throne room!  With giant centipedes!  Next, the party found a throne room/audience chamber, strewn with nasty old pillows.  Dhilgo decided to pick one up, and it burst, releasing a pile of giant poisonous centipedes.  The party withdrew hastily, closed to door behind them, and moved on.

A secret door!  And a spear trap!  After poking around some doors and corridors, the player characters found a ruined feasting hall where they uncovered a secret door.  Immediately beyond the door were the tell-tale marks of a spear trap.  The player characters triggered the trap and proceeded to break the spears, rendering it relatively safe for the moment (at least until the kobold work crew repairs it).

Goblins!  And a deal is struck!  The secret passage led to the camp of a goblin tribe.  Several of the player characters had a decent command of the goblin language, and the goblins seemed relatively desperate to cut some kind of a deal, so the party agreed to pay the goblins 50 gold pieces to guide them to Kobold Korners, and the goblins agreed.

Full circle!  To Kobold Korners!  It turned out that the way to Kobold Korners actually involved going back to the octagonal room where the player characters started out following the mysterious figure—beyond the room and through a few twisting passageways and the party was face to face with the entrance to Kobold Korners, heavily guarded by kobolds (of course), who have asked the party to turn over their weapons and come on into their wretched hive of scum and villainy!

All of this action happened in a maze of corridors and octagonal rooms.  In fact, the party found no less than eighteen new doors and corridors that they didn’t explore.  So there’s lots more of Stonehell awaiting!

On to the next session!

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